How To Grab Your Audience’s Undivided Attention in 2018

Don't worry, this won't be a long read. You wouldn't read it if it was, anyway.

At least this is what the trend shows: our attention span is getting shorter when we're online, making content creators' job harder.

While we can't compete with all the distraction coming from Facebook, Instagram, Candy Crush and who knows what else, constantly nudging your pocket like a little child hungry for attention, not all is lost. 

As an entrepreneur, you might face the same problem. But there's one thing in your hands that Candy Crush is lacking: real value.

But how can you fight for a moment of attention in this messy jungle to let people see your worth? Should you join the club of addictive apps or there's another way? 

Listen to our newest podcast episode to find out! 

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Episode Transcript

What You'll Discover in this Episode:

  • What the Skinner Box Experiment teaches us and how you're exposed to Skinner Boxes every minute of your life without noticing it. 
  • Do we really get pleasure from being addicted to these applications? What do they really do to us?
  • Who is your competition? There's more than what you think.
  • How you can be mindful about provinding great content to your audience without turning them into mindless zombies.
  • Action-packed tips on how you can make yourself seen online and get the attention from the right people. 
  • Blog post formatting hacks to keep even the lazy readers on your page and boost your conversion rate.

Resources

Here are the resources we mentioned during the episode:

Are You With Us?

If you got this far without getting distracted: Congratulations. You accomplished the biggest challenge of the 21st century. 

How do you keep your audience's attention? What are your best tips to keep them engaged? Share your story with us.

Join the conversation in the comments section or send us a voice message by clicking on the button below, and share your stories, questions, suggestions with us.

Also, if you have a question that you'd like to be answered on the podcast, send a tweet to @actigrow or leave a voice message below.

The next episode is coming soon!

About the Author Alexandra Kozma

Alexandra is a traveling marketer. When she is not editing podcast episodes or writing blog posts, she's out there exploring a new city. She's the creator of the Morning Mindset daily mindfulness journal.

  • Guillaume says:

    Hello,

    The direct link for the mp3 file is linking to episode 25 instead of 26. Cheers.

    • Alexandra Kozma says:

      Hello Guillaume! Thanks for pointing it out and sorry about it! I’ve updated the link.

  • Randal+V says:

    I wonder how entrepreneurs’ susceptibility to mindless pleasure seeking compares to the general public. Maybe that’s a good niche study to be done.

    My Skinner boxes are the ActiveGrowth podcast and Thrive Themes. When I hear that intro music; the saliva starts flowing :-)

    A Production Note: Hanne’s audio is a bit too loud and it’s also somewhat distorted.

    • Shane Melaugh says:

      Thanks, Randal!

      That’s an interesting thought, yes. I would expect that entrepreneurial success is inversely correlated with distractedness. But I don’t know if successful entrepreneurs start out less susceptible to distraction or if they train themselves to be that way.

      Regarding the audio: I apologize for the issues. We’ve been using a recording tool that seems to be overly sensitive to volume. We’re working on improving this.

  • Seán says:

    Shane, I don’t think Thrive Themes is in danger of running out of customers any time soon ; there have never been so many entrepreneurs and bootstrappers out there. :)

    I know Skinner also used a “reverse Skinner box” where the mouse would press a button to avoid something unpleasant… and that raises a question.

    I sell IT support for small businesses, so they’re basically paying for something that I take away from them. I find it interesting that in this case I’m not actually asking for their attention once they become a client. In fact, I’m taking their attention away from something unpleasant so they can focus more on something else more important.

    Any ideas how to implement that reverse Skinner box in marketing?

    • Shane Melaugh says:

      That’s a really interesting point!

      What you’re offering is something like pain avoidance and peace of mind. I think from a marketing perspective, people will be willing to pay for this when they are in a state of peak frustration.

      Someone may be a potential customer for your service, but they probably won’t be willing to pay for a solution to a problem they could potentially have. They will be willing to pay if they very recently experienced the pain your service offers to take away.

      • Seán says:

        That’s exactly right. It narrows down the targeting but also makes it hard in a sense. I find I have to wait until they have a problem before they become paying customers. Highlighting the time they are losing on normal maintenance just doesn’t work and playing the waiting-for-the-inevitable-problem waiting game isn’t very efficient. But I’ll get there … :)

  • Anna says:

    I’d love to download this ep (my home internet connection is down), but when I click your link it just opens a tab and plays the content. Am I doing something wrong?

  • Lovelda says:

    Loved this episode – I’ll be honest it’s the first one that has truly held my attention from beginning to end. My biggest take away is to shift my thinking from pure “numbers” to “fans”. In some ways it’s so simple, in others it fundamentally changes my approach to what I do. It’s not a quick win, it’ sustaining interest by delivering value overtime to build trust and EARN attention. Very powerful stuff, keep them coming.

  • Konrad says:

    Hi Shane, thank you for the great podcast. Could you please explain, why you think that Nir Eyal/the book Hooked is not a good read? You mentioned a quite strong opinion about that person.

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